Going to Hospital? Wondering what to take? How about an iPad?

Roy Lilley, NHS Writer, Broadcaster, commentator and conference speaker, has penned an excellent article outlining the experience that engaged patients are increasingly expecting to have on their next hospital stay and isn’t a million miles away from what Hospital colleagues of mine are already witnessing in hospital beds across the UK and Ireland:

If I was going into hospital I wondered what contingency items I might take. I thought of wet-wipes and yes I thought of soft, plump loo-paper, too! I thought of Kendall Mint Cake beloved of mountain climbers and used as survival rations. Then I realised there was only one thing I would take into hospital. I’d take an iPad.

I would have a daily supply of newspapers without worrying about Bert from the ‘Friends’ arriving with the trolley, late midmorning, and saying a breathless; “Sorry mate, I’ve only got the Sun left”. I would use Google to find the latest, recommended treatments for my ailments. I’d search the web, the BMJ-on-Line, the Lancet, NICE, the New England Journal of Medicine, NHS Choices and alternative therapies. I would record ward rounds and what the consultant said.

I would use my time to construct a web site and using free-on-line software create a chat-room for patients. I’d use the right tags to accelerate www.inbedwithroy.com up the Google search algorithm. I’d link to a Twitter account and give blow by blow commentary on the comings and goings. Once on-line it’s easy to use free software to create a blog and link to the like-minded. I’d record and publish hand hygiene and use the camera to provide supporting evidence. I’d create a video of miscreants and post it on YouTube. I’d create an ‘NHS Spring-Clean’!

From the comfort of my bed I’d have a look at the Trust web-site, fathom out the name of the chief executive, look at the format of the Trust’s email addresses and pop him (or her) an email inviting them to come and visit for a chat.

I’ll have an App and do my own BP and temperature. I’d use Skype to video conference with friends and relatives. I’d download a neat little App to advise me on adverse drug reactions. If I was in any doubt I’d buy a subscription with 3G Doctor for an on-line second opinion. Oh, and I’ll watch a movie and not pay a fortune for the bedside TV.

If I didn’t like the food; I’d order a Pizza. I’m the e-patient from hell!

The full article can be found in the latest nhsManagers.net mailing. Thousands of NHS managers, all over the UK, receive these mailings up to 3 times a week accessing the latest important news, comment and analysis. Click here to sign up today.

Please note: With 3G Doctor patients only pay when they consult with an informed registered Doctor (£35 per consultation) so no need for patients (like Roy “ePatient from Hell”) to purchase a subscription.

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5 Responses to Going to Hospital? Wondering what to take? How about an iPad?

  1. Pingback: Going to Hospital? Wondering what to take? How about an iPad? | mPayments are coming | Scoop.it

  2. Pingback: Humor Break: the ePatient from hell | Michael Scharf

  3. Fascinating! I was expecting much worse when I read the headline – now I’m wondering, what’s the “from hell” part of these behaviours??

    (Honest question. Feel free to point out the obvious to me…)

    • Hi Dave,

      Thanks for the comment. You’d need to read the full article to appreciate the perspective. It started with a description of a patient who had much lower expectations of their carers, Roy was making the point that he’s going to make life difficult (“hell”) for those who don’t appreciate the opportunities that there are when patients are engaged and want to use modern digital technologies.

      I was hoping to encourage those interested to sign up at NHSManagers.net to access this free content but as you’ve asked here’s the full text:

      e-Patient from hell

      News and Comment from Roy Lilley
      PPA ‘Columnist of the Year’ – Finalist

      I hear tell of an elderly lady. She is stick thin, as frail as a wafer but with the heart of a New Zealand rugby player.

      She would object to that; New Zealand. She is a patriot she would want the ‘heart of an English rugby player’ but would accept they don’t have hearts anymore. They have agents, image-rights consultants and wallets.

      She is well up with the machinations of the world of rugby. She is across politics and world affairs. She has been to Egypt, with the foreign office and is watching the Arab Spring with insight and interest.

      During the war she was in the RAF and worked on something she is never quite specific about, at Cranwell. She was there at the time Frank Whittle was there, developing his jet engine. So, draw your own conclusions.

      Our bright, doughty lady was off to hospital. When her Polish ‘carer’ turned up to help the great lady get ready, she was surprise. Adelajda was the fifth carer in two months so she had not, yet, quite got to understand what to expect from an 87 year old that did the Telegraph crossword every day.

      She was ready, packed and with three strange items Adelajda couldn’t work out. There was a light bulb, a role of loo paper and a walking stick. So the story goes; the light bulb was because the last time our lady was in hospital a light bulb in the toilet had ‘gone’ and in the four days she was in hospital it was not replaced.

      The loo paper was because on the last visit they had run out and anyway NHS utilitarian loo-paper is not suited to an 87 year old sit-upon. The walking stick was a mystery. Our indomitable lady never used a walking stick. However, based on her previous experience, when she was unable to reach the call pulley, the walking stick would do nicely; to hook the chord and give it a determined yank.

      This lady is part of the redoubtable generation, hardened by world-war, annealed by shortages and imbued with commonsense. Someone who queues, puts-up-with-it and gets-on-with-it. Hardly the patient from hell.

      If I was going into hospital I wondered what contingency items I might take. I thought of wet-wipes and yes I thought of soft, plump loo-paper, too! I thought of Kendall Mint Cake beloved of mountain climbers and used as survival rations.

      Then I realised there was only one thing I would take into hospital. I’d take an iPad.

      I would have a daily supply of newspapers without worrying about Bert from the ‘Friends’ arriving with the trolley, late midmorning, and saying a breathless; “Sorry mate, I’ve only got the Sun left”.

      I would use Google to find the latest, recommended treatments for my ailments. I’d search the web, the BMJ-on-Line, the Lancet, NICE, the New England Journal of Medicine, NHS Choices and alternative therapies. I would record ward rounds and what the consultant said.

      I would use my time to construct a web site and using free-on-line software create a chat-room for patients. I’d use the right tags to accelerate http://www.inbedwithroy.com up the Google search algorithm. I’d link to a Twitter account and give blow by blow commentary on the comings and goings. Once on-line it’s easy to use free software to create a blog and link to the like-minded. I’d record and publish hand hygiene and use the camera to provide supporting evidence. I’d create a video of miscreants and post it on YouTube. I’d create an ‘NHS Spring-Clean’!

      From the comfort of my bed I’d have a look at the Trust web-site, fathom out the name of the chief executive, look at the format of the Trust’s email addresses and pop him (or her) an email inviting them to come and visit for a chat.

      I’ll have an App and do my own BP and temperature.

      I’d use Skype to video conference with friends and relatives. I’d download a neat little App to advise me on adverse drug reactions. If I was in any doubt I’d buy a subscription with 3G Doctor for an on-line second opinion. Oh, and I’ll watch a movie and not pay a fortune for the bedside TV.

      If I didn’t like the food; I’d order a Pizza. I’m the

      e-patient from hell!

  4. Pingback: NeverSeconds II: One senior’s daily dose of meals on wheels « mHealth Insight: the blog of 3G Doctor

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